Tasca G.A. (2015, March). What clinicians want from psychotherapy research. [Web Article].

The tension between science and practice in psychotherapy has been described as a war or a “bad marriage” (Greene, 2014). Some writers on the research side of the divide characterize clinicians as lacking in knowledge and skill in empirically supported interventions (Karlin & Cross, 2014), while others suggest that clinicians are romantics when it comes to psychotherapy practice, and that they may be subject to cognitive biases when making clinical decisions (Lilienfeld et al., 2013). Writers on the clinical side of the divide argue that randomized controlled trials represent a limited form of evidence (Westen et al., 2004), and that there may be a feeling of resentment among practitioners that researchers disseminate their findings upon clinicians (Greene, 2014).

<… …> I find it useful to note the distinction between dissemination and knowledge translation and exchange (KTE; Graham et al., 2006). Dissemination refers to researchers relaying their findings by traditional means like manuscript publications, and creating lists of evidence based treatments and practices. The expectation is that clinicians will read the research and change their practices accordingly. The current state of the psychotherapy practice-research divide indicates that dissemination alone has not been effective to move research into the therapy room.

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Vai all’articolo di Tasca G.A. et al. (2014). What clinicians want: Findings from a psychotherapy practice research network survey. Psychotherapy, 52(1), 1-11.