Solms M. & Panksepp J. (in press). Why depression feels bad.

Solms M. & Panksepp J. (2016). Why depression feels bad.

IN PRESS: CH Ashton and EK Perry (eds) The Neuroscience of Conscious/Nonconscious Interactions   [working title]

v. anche  New Horizons in the Neuroscience of Consciousness. Edited by Elaine K. Perry, Daniel Collerton, Fiona E.N. LeBeau and Heather Ashton Newcastle University, John Benjamins Publishing Company. Advances in Consciousness Research, 79 2010.  xxv, 330 pp.

ABSTRACT

We believe that conscious mental phenomena (such as feelings) are not epiphenomenal to the workings of the brain. Feelings evolved for good biological reasons; they make specific, concrete contributions to brain functioning. Notwithstanding all the philosophical complexities, therefore, the non-conscious/conscious interactions that are the focus of this book are, in our view, causal interactions.Tomarginalize consciousness in relation to what is ultimately a dualistic scientific understanding of how the brain works is likely to lead us badly astray. We illustrate this view by trying to address the question: why does depression feel bad?

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